Contraception

The choice of method of contraception is very personal. While many forms of contraception are available, only a consultation with your gynecologist will determine what is most appropriate for you.

Currently, some of the methods of contraception available are:

The Pill

There are dozens of versions of the oral contraceptive pill (popularly called ‘the pill’), either as combined estrodial and progesterone, or as progesterone only, with variation in dosage and sequence of administration between brands. The pill works by suppressing ovulation and keeping the lining of the uterus thin.
Usually, the pill is to be taken at the same time every day, for example in the evening, prior to going to bed. The effectiveness of the pill can be compromised by forgetting to take it, by illness like vomiting and/or diarrhea, and by combining it with other medications like some antibiotics.
As a bonus, some skin problems may benefit from some versions of the pill.
A consultation with your doctor must take place prior to receiving a prescription for the pill and it should be noted that overweight or breastfeeding women require prescribing with very special care.

NuvaRing

NuvaRing is an elastic ring that is inserted into the vagina to release an estrodial and progesterone combination for 21 days then the NuvaRing is removed. The insertion and removal are done manually by the woman herself. NuvaRing works in a similar way to the pill, as it suppresses ovulation and keeps the lining of the uterus thin.
The advantage of NuvaRing lies mainly in avoiding the disadvantages of taking oral contraception, which has to pass through the digestive tract and liver and may be compromised in the presence of illness or other medications. Statistically, the effectiveness of NuvaRing is identical to that of the pill.
A consultation with your doctor must take place prior to receiving a prescription for NuvaRing.

Contraceptive Patch

The contraceptive patch is ideally placed on the upper arm and continuously releases an estrodial and progesterone combination for one week. The patch is then removed and replaced by a new patch. This happens for three consecutive weeks and the fourth week is patch-free, which allows withdrawal bleeding. The patch works in a similar way to the pill, as it suppresses ovulation and keeps the lining of the uterus thin.
The advantage of the patch is in its easy application and avoiding the disadvantages of taking oral contraception, which has to pass through the digestive tract and liver and may be compromised in the presence of illness or other medications. Statistically, the effectiveness of the patch is identical to that of the pill.
A consultation with your doctor must take place prior to receiving a prescription for the contraceptive patch.

Intra Uterine Device (IUD)

Evidence of IUDs has been found in Ancient Egyptian culture, making it one of the oldest known methods of contraception. Basically, the IUD provides a barrier to fertilization.
Today’s IUDs are covered with either copper or progesterone and change the biochemical environment of the uterus. The progesterone IUD provides another important advantage in that it stabilizes the lining of the uterus and may be helpful to women who experience heavy and/or frequent bleeding.
However, the IUD is not suitable for every woman and individual factors must be taken into consideration. A consultation with your doctor must take place prior to receiving an IUD.
Gyne Fix is a very small copper containing intrauterine device (IUD) with a duration of action of five years, that is over 99% effective at preventing pregnancy. It is smaller than any other IUD. The size of an IUD is closely related to the side effects it causes, so that smaller devices are better tolerated with less effect on the amount of blood loss.

Condoms

The primary use of condoms today lies not in contraception, but in the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases, for example HIV. In ancient cultures, condoms were made from animal tissue, but today the production of condoms is standardized, providing a good level of reliability. Prior to intercourse a condom must be properly fitted to the penis to reduce the risk of rupturing or accidental loss of the condom during intercourse.
Condoms are widely available for over-the-counter purchase, but Dr Naumann can help you with instructions on how to properly fit a condom for maximum effectiveness.

Contraceptive Implant

The implant is a relatively recent addition to the methods of contraception. It is a tiny progesterone-releasing device that is implanted under the skin and may be left in place for up to three years, but can be removed at any time.
The implant works by maintaining a thin lining of the uterus and dense mucus in the cervix that acts as a barrier to sperm. Due to the thinness of the lining of the uterus maintained by the implant, menstruation is usually light and in some cases may cease completely.
A consultation with your doctor must take place prior to receiving an implant.

Contraceptive Injection

The most common of this type of contraceptive consists of a three-monthly injection of progesterone that works in a similar way to the implant, but is thought to be less reliable. The benefits are similar to those of the implant and there are indications that the injection method can be helpful in milder forms of endometriosis that do not require surgery.
A consultation with your doctor must take place prior to receiving a contraceptive.

IUB Intra Uterina Ball

Is made of a number of tiny copper balls kept together by a thread which rolls up to a sfere. Once inserted into the uterine cavity, it has the same Pearl Index ( safety index ) as the classical IUD. This device is not painful during insertion and will not perforate or irritate the uterine wall.

Natural Methods

Natural methods of contraception are as old as recorded history and include coitus interruptus (interrupted intercourse, commonly known as the ‘withdrawal method’) and charting woman’s body temperature for indications of the fertile phase of the menstrual cycle.
These methods are the least reliable, but may be preferred for religious and/or cultural reasons. Dr Naumann can help you with instructions on how to use these methods to best effect.